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Jacob Javits Gifted and Talented Students Education Act

SENG: Jacob Javits Gifted and Talented Students Education Act

US Congress 1988

“The Jacob Javits Gifted and Talented Students Education Act (Javits) was originally passed by Congress in 1988 as part of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act to support the development of talent in U.S. schools. The Javits Act, which is the only federal program dedicated specifically to gifted and talented students, does not fund local gifted education programs. The purpose of the Act is to orchestrate a coordinated program of scientifically based research, demonstration projects, innovative strategies, and similar activities that build and enhance the ability of elementary and secondary schools to meet the special educational needs of gifted and talented students. Click here to read more about how the Javits program supports gifted students from disadvantaged backgrounds.

The Javits Act focuses resources on identifying and serving students who are traditionally underrepresented in gifted and talented programs, particularly economically disadvantaged, limited-English proficient, and disabled students, to help reduce gaps in achievement and to encourage the establishment of equal educational opportunities for all students.

The Javits Program Has Three Primary Components:

(1) the National Research Center on the Gifted and Talented, which provides a forum for researchers, practitioners, policymakers, and others to work together to design and conduct research and ensure that it informs educational policy and practice;

(2) competitive demonstration grants to institutions of higher education and state and local education agencies to develop and expand models serving students who are underrepresented in gifted and talented programs; and

(3) since 2001, there are competitive grants to state agencies and school districts to implement programs that would enhance gifted education offerings statewide. However, overall funding for the program must exceed $7.5 million before state grants are awarded.

To read more about how the Javits program supports high-ability learners from under-represented populations, click here.

Click here to read more about the positive outcomes of more than a dozen Javits grants projects.

The Javits Act uses the federal definition of “gifted and talented students,” which is located in the definitions section of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act.

Students, children, or youth who give evidence of high achievement capability in areas such as intellectual, creative, artistic, or leadership capacity, or in specific academic fields, and who need services and activities not ordinarily provided by the school in order to fully develop those capabilities.

The U.S. Department of Education administers the Javits program, and maintains a program website.

The Javits program, like other authorized programs, must be funded each year by the Congress. The program was de-funded by Congress in fiscal year 2011. Click here for the annual funding history of the Javits Act.”

Find the SENG article here: Jacob Javits Gifted and Talented Students Education Act

JACOB K. JAVITS GIFTED AND TALENTED STUDENTS EDUCATION PROGRAM

From US Department of Education (ed.gov):

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION
The purpose of this program is to carry out a coordinated program of scientifically based research, demonstration projects, innovative strategies, and similar activities designed to build and enhance the ability of elementary and secondary schools to meet the special education needs of gifted and talented students. The major emphasis of the program is on serving students traditionally underrepresented in gifted and talented programs, particularly economically disadvantaged, limited English proficient (LEP), and disabled students, to help reduce the serious gap in achievement among certain groups of students at the highest levels of achievement.

Grants are awarded under two priorities. Priority One supports initiatives to develop and scale up models serving students who are underrepresented in gifted and talented programs. Priority Two supports state and local efforts to improve services for gifted and talented students.

TYPES OF PROJECTS
Programs and projects (SEA and LEA capacity-building grants) must carry out one or more of the following:

Conducting scientifically based research on methods and techniques for identifying and teaching gifted and talented students—and for using these programs and methods to serve all students; and conducting program evaluations, surveys, and other analyses needed to accomplish the purpose of this program;

Carrying out professional development for personnel involved in the education of gifted and talented students;

Establishing and operating model projects and exemplary programs for serving gifted and talented students, including innovative methods of serving students whose needs may not be met by more traditional gifted and talented programs (including summer programs, mentoring, service learning, and programs involving business, industry, and education);

Implementing innovative strategies, such as cooperative learning, peer tutoring, and service learning;

Providing technical assistance and information on how to serve gifted and talented students and, where appropriate, how to adapt these programs to serve all students;

Making materials and services available through state regional education service centers, IHEs, or other entities; or

Providing challenging, high-level course work, disseminated through technologies (including distance learning), for students in schools or LEAs that would not otherwise have the resources for such course work.

In addition, the program supports the National Research Center on the Gifted and Talented for the purpose of carrying out the allowable activities already described. Not more than 30 percent of program funds can be spent for research.

Find the webpage here: JACOB K. JAVITS GIFTED AND TALENTED STUDENTS EDUCATION PROGRAM

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